News

American barn

American barn

Translations: NL
Almost finished: an American barn. More to follow… In Almere in The Netherlands by the way, where something comparable, but bigger, has been built a couple of years ago: the “Rode Donders”.
Chalet Fifi in St. Jean d'Aulps

Chalet Fifi in St. Jean d'Aulps

Translations: NL
Last year we built a panel house in St. Jeans d’Aulps, about ten minutes from Morzine in France. And we promised to add some more photo. Here they are. It looks like a log house, but like many houses in the Alps it actually is a panel house. We also have photos from the interior and then the difference is more obvious. We will show you later. The style is very different from our Eric & Flo or the At & Alet, but this house totally fits in it’s environment.
New loghouse in Oosterwold

New loghouse in Oosterwold

Translations: NL
Just handed over to client: a new loghouse in Oosterwold, Netherlands. Inspired by the Eric & Flo, 120 m2 brutto surface.
Cold

Cold

Translations: NL
It is well known that timber from the North is heavier. It grows slower, and it is more dense. Better quality wood. We came back from a business meeting just South of Vilnius and when we drove through a forest, we made this short movie. Nice, made us think of slow growing pine. And then in the evening when we came back from work, we looked at the dashboard and saw the temperature…
Larch getting grey

Larch getting grey

Translations: NL
We often use larch on the facades of our houses, because it is very weather resistant. Doesn’t rot, needs no maintenance, protects your house for fifty years. But there is one thing about larch that is not to everybodies liking: it turns grey. Some people like the natural greying of larch, because it is natural. But others prefer to keep the original colours, for instance as in this house. We like the greying, but if you want to keep the original yellowish-orange tint of larch, then you must treat the facade with special products.
Eric & Flo

Eric & Flo

Translations: NL
The Eric & Flo still is, after eight years, the house for which we receive most requests. These photos we received today from our clients in the Lozère. Winter wonderland with a beautiful house…
Wooden logs and cracks

Wooden logs and cracks

Translations: NL
Log houses and cracks Log houses are built from wooden logs, that is: solid or laminated wooden beams, from eight centimeters thick upto thirty centimeters thick. We usually build our walls twelve or sixteen centimeters thick. Twelve is more than enough for a two-level house, but if you got money to spare then sixteen centimeters just looks nice. Otherwise there is little difference. But what about cracks? Yes, especially solid wooden logs do crack, and quite a bit.
St. Jean d'Aulps

St. Jean d'Aulps

Translations: NL
When we rebuild our website we lost quite some content. A post about a house that we built last year in St. Jean d’Aulps (just 10 minutes North of Morzine) also disappeared in cyberspace, so now we place it again. Although it looks like a log house, this actually is a panel house. We built the wooden part, a local contractor did the concrete foundation (but we supplied the windows that went into the concrete part).
Unloading in the rain, again

Unloading in the rain, again

Translations: NL
And another photo of unloading, and this time the rain had just stopped. Our client watched while we were busy with panels and trucks and a crane, and she took a photo. Look at the reflection. You don’t need a fancy camera to see the beauty of reflections.
Unloading in the rain

Unloading in the rain

Translations: NL
Right after we wrote something about building sites and mud, we start with another project in the polder. And guess what… rain with the first truck. At least we got some nice photos, taken by our client. Our men were less enthousiastic. Minus twenty degrees Celcius is ok for them, but water… At least next week will be better.
Stuck in the mud

Stuck in the mud

Translations: NL
Not all building sites are easily accessible. Some are in the mountains and the trucks have to make tight U-turns as they climb the mountain, other building sites have no roads at all and we have to unload somewhere else and bring our building materials with some flatbed car behind a tractor. And then there are building sites that have something that looks like a road, only it isn’t.
Travels and restaurants

Travels and restaurants

Translations: NL
Since our factories are in Lithuania, and our clients mostly in France and The Netherlands, we travel a lot. And we jump from one culture to the other, and we never notice. Except, every now and then, we feel a difference, like yesterday. We had had a meeting in the Nort-East of Lithuania, five kilometers from Belorussia. Russia itself starts fifty kilometers further and from there it is Russia all the way until Vladivostok, next to North-Korea.
Walls and rafters ready

Walls and rafters ready

Translations: NL
We started with this project end of August, and now we are two weeks down the road: walls ready, rafter are on the roof. Our engineers decided that they needed a really serious beam at the top of the roof, serious as in: more than 300 kilo, not something that you just lift and place on top. Here comes a crane again…
Mud

Mud

Translations: NL
Building houses is nice, but mud is not. And when we build, there is always mud. Even worse is building in the rain. If it rains we go sit inside. But then you want a cup of coffee. So you have to go outside again, to get water, through the mud in the rain… Naja, tomorrow will be better.
Gardening while building

Gardening while building

Translations: NL
Building a new house takes ages. Years, literally. Buying a plot, making a design, asking for permissions, changing the design, waiting, changing a bit more, waiting a little longer. And all the time you are mentally busy, but physically you can do nothing, except wait. Just wait. But some clients can’t wait. They start with the garden. Grass, trees, hedges. And why not… We can tell you why not: because in a minute we will show up with our fifteen ton crane and turn your garden into a wasteland.
Stucco on the outside

Stucco on the outside

Translations: NL
Sometimes it looks as if we only use larch on the outisde of our houses. But that is not correct, we can use other materials as well. We can offer painted pine, and also we can do stucco. In the case of stucco: first we finish the outside with Knauf Aquapenel or Steico Protect, then later we add the stucco layer on top. These images are from a house that we handed over in July 2020, with only the Knauf Aquapanel, as this client will add the stucco layer hoimself.
Cake and champagne

Cake and champagne

Translations: NL
Sometimes we’re lucky. Yesterday we started with the build of a new loghouse near Rotterdam. Step one: unloading of the truck. The future owners of the house had arranged a crane for us. Usually we have to work with a one-tonne crane or a small Manitou, but this time we saw a 40-tonne crane driving onto the dike. Or 90 tonne, we don’t know but it was big. A few hoists, and our truck was empty.
House ready

House ready

Translations: NL
In the South of The Netherlands we built a panel house. Some clients don’t like wood on ths inside, and in that case a panel house is the perfect solution as you can finish the walls any way you like. This client chose larch on the outside, vertical as per architect design and in combination with a Ruukki sheet metal roof, and stucco on the inside. We are almost ready.
Second item in Google

Second item in Google

Translations: NL
We searched using Google for “images of modern log houses”, because obviously we are curious what our colleagues are doing. And guess what: the second item that Google presented to us was our own house, the Eric & Flo. We take it as a compliment.
How quickly can we build

How quickly can we build

Translations: NL
Construction speed is an important factor for consumers. Which we honestly find a little odd, because a full new build projects takes a year at least, usually two years and sometimes up to three years. Making designs, doing calculations, getting permits, sometimes it seems to take ages, and so we do not always understand why we should do the actual construction in just a few weeks when the entire project takes two years anyways.