Revit And HoloLens Versus Pencils

These days we design everything in 3D software such as AutoDesk Revit, and sometimes Sketchup. For us the main advantage is that it allows us to more easily communicate with clients.

 3d_model_of_wooden_house
3d_model_of_wooden_house

The old 2D drawings worked very well for the experienced specialist, but for everybody else 3D is easier.

meeting_on_building_site_02
meeting_on_building_site_02

We haven’t seen any HoloLens augmented reality goggles on our building sites yet, but laptops are common. We still think it is a bit risky to open your 3.000 euro MacBook in the dust and the dirt, but hey, you need to check this 3D window connection thing so…

But even with all this 3D stuff some challenges remain. The engineer behind his super 3D CAD station can place a foundation pole to the millimeter in his drawing, but there is no way the guy that runs the drilling machine can place that pole to the millimeter. With wood we can work almost to the millimeter, but foundations have a much bigger construction tolerance. So once on the building site we may find the foundation to be slightly different from what we expected. Now what?

meeting_on_building_site_03
meeting_on_building_site_03

Easy: we use a pencil and a piece of wood, and we fix it. No AutoCAD, no 3D Revit, no HoloLens, just a pencil. Works fine.

meeting_on_building_site_06
meeting_on_building_site_06

Of course there is a risk to it. The flexibility that you get from fixing things on the building site might be offset by the introduction of construction errors. It is exactly this disconnect between the 3D design from the office and the actual implementation on the building site, that made a multi-level car park collapse at Eindhoven Airport.

meeting_on_building_site_07
meeting_on_building_site_07

But for simple things like the windows installation in a log house we feel confident that we can fix it with a pencil.