Lithuania, Is That OK?

We produce our houses in Lithuania, just East of Poland. East-Europe. And that raises a few concerns. Are these people to be trusted? What about the quality? Do they deliver on time?

We understand you concerns. Here are some answers.

Trakai castle, 14th century

Trakai castle, 14th century

Can we trust them?

Lithuania is on the Baltic coast, and has been a supplier of wood for ages. In the 17th century the Lithuanians had a permanent supply chain between Klaipeda and German, Dutch and English shipyards. The Dutch even developed a special type of ship for this trade, the “fluitschip“.

What was special about the fluitschip? Well, the Dutch had to pay toll in the Øresund between Denmark and Sweden. And they paid a lot of toll, actually two thirds of Danish state income was toll money. The height of the toll depended on the width of the upper deck of the ship. The Dutch, cheapskates as they are, developed the fluitschip such that it had a very wide belly and at the same time a very narrow upper deck. Yep, lots of freight, and little toll, that’s how we roll…

Just like today economics ruled the transport. The fluitschip became bigger every ten years, and it got re-designed so that it could be sailed with less personnel. The Dutch built about 500 of them every year, so this was truly industrial mass production, serious business. Nothing has changed.

Vilnius in snow

Vilnius in snow

In the city of Lelystad the Dutch recently re-built the Batavia, or actually they reconstructed it based on old documents and shipwrecks. Guess where the shipyard in Lelystad purchased most of the wood. Exactly: in Lithuania.

Just like the Netherlands, Lithuania has a long tradition in international trade. Rotterdam may be the main supply harbour for a big part of West-Europe, but the Baltic harbours supply the East-European mainland, for hundreds of kilometers deep into Russia. Vilnius is an ancient Hanze-city, and the Lithuanians have been doing international business for centuries. Their banks are fully integrated in the international banking systems and they speak the necessary languages: German, English, Russian. And, very important: they share the same mentality, they know how to develop and maintain international trade relations. Payment and delivery discipline? No difference with West-Europe.

Kaunas city hall

Kaunas city hall

Lithuania was the first USSR-country that declared independance, in 1990. Currently it is a member of NATO and the EU, and part of the Schengen agreement. From Paris to Vilnius is 20 hours in the car, and no passport control!

So can we trust the Lithuanians? Actually yes, very much, since the 17th century and before.

What about the quality?

Lithuania is East-Europe, is this not where they produced Lada and Trabant? Did they not build these ghastly appartment blocks you still see in East-Berlin?

Yep, true. Since the Second World War some parts of the USSR industry have been seriously neglected. No surprise, the economic model was not very inspiring for anyone that wanted to increase efficiency or quality.

forest in Lithuania

forest in Lithuania

But they didn’t loose their craftmanship. The Lithuanians have been building wooden houses for ages, and now that they can again organise their own economy themselves, quality is back to normal. They use the same equipment (often German and Swiss) that we use in West-Europe, they have the same ISO-certificates, their quality standards are identical to EU- and West European standards. No difference.

And most important is their craftmanship. You want to know how to build a wooden house? Go to the Baltics, they can tell you exactly how it’s done.

more forest. Plenty forest in Lithuania

more forest. Plenty forest in Lithuania

Do they deliver on time?

Yes, they do. We have never experienced a delay. We’ re always on time, always. We have to, because just like anywhere else there is one rule: trust is hard to gain but easy to lose. Or: trust comes in like a chiton and goes out like cheetah. Not in time means: a damaged reputation. So you bet we are on time, just like in the 17th century.

Production of a wooden house takes about four to five weeks. Then we have three to four days for transport, so we can start assembly in week six. Assembly then takes four to eight weeks, depending on the size of your house.

Vilnius skyline

Vilnius skyline

Still concerned?

Not necessary. If you would like to see the factory we will gladly show you around. Wizzair, Ryanair or Air Baltic will fly you to Vilnius or Kaunas for less than 100 euro. Four-star hotel in Vilnius for 50 euro. We kindly invite you to the beautiful country of Lithuana!

Vilnius skyline

Vilnius skyline